Reflection

I’m often asked how embroidering with wire is different to linen and thread. I have written about this previously which you can find here, but for my graduate exhibition I thought I would produce a work that visualises the action. Below is a short video of the installation.  

Transposition

Embroideries passed down as heirlooms are a tangible link to family never met and actions never seen. They highlight how repetitive actions are an integral component of the everyday, the generation of knowledge, identity and heritage. As a scientist I have observed that my own physical actions via repetitive experimentation inform my thinking. By producing…

Kerrilyn: five actions (306-10)

Scientific investigations often require repetitious methods. To carry out these methods the scientist’s body is often tracing the same physical movement with each experiment. Kerrilyn kindly allowed me to document her filtering soil samples in preparation for carbon analysis. This work explores the relationship between what Kerrilyn is doing and how she is physically moving…

Sharmane

During my residency at the Ecosciences Precinct I had the pleasure of meeting a lady called Sharmane. One of her responsibilities is to monitor chlorophyll levels of water samples that are sourced from around Queensland. This information is used to understand what level of plant/algae life is in the waterways and how it may be changing over…

30th May, 2016

On the 30th of May I set myself up in the foyer of the Ecosciences Precinct and drew the movement of people that was occurring in front of me with a blue pen. I used a roll of chart paper I gave myself a number of parameters: I was going to draw for 8 hours (8.30am-4.30pm);…

Secchi Drawings

As a part of my residency at the Ecosciences Precinct I got the opportunity to go out on one of the data collection boats. They started collecting water samples just off Sea World and stopped about 13 times at various points all the way back to Jacobs Well. The analysis that I found most intriguing was…